P. S.

The saga continues …

Recently I was researching the weaving pamphlets published by Robin & Russ Handweavers titled “Warp and Weft”. I have three issues and I wanted to find out if they existed online anywhere. As luck would have it, I found a blog that had links to that very series. (The blog belongs to Robyn Spady and it is chock full of lots of good information.)

The link she provided belongs to the On-Line Digital Archive of Documents on Weaving and Related Topics. If you haven’t been to this site, you really should. There is a plethora of weaving information, including PDF’s of long out of print documents.  All for you.

So then, I thought, what if this site has Practical Weaving Suggestions too? And yes, kids, it does. It has PDF’s of many issues (not all), and it also has a chart of issues and years.  I cross-checked the chart with my spread sheet and found two of my missing issues. So what did I do?

I downloaded them! I got “Imprisoned Sequins” by Mary M. Atwater:

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And, I got Vol. XXII (c. 1952) “Planned Weaving for the Handweaver’s Wardrobe” by Marta Page, which, on the surface sounds kind of ho-hum.

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But when you look further, you find the Fledermaus Shortie:

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which has an oddly modern flair:

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Unfortunately, actual instructions for weaving and sewing the Shortie are not in the issue, but instructions for ordering them (sans internet) are provided :-).

I wonder if any copies are still around …

May we also suggest . . .

I wrote about the “Practical Weaving Suggestions” pamphlets published by Lily Mills in my last blog post. These pamphlets ceased publication in 1971 and they were followed in 1976 by a new series, also published by Lily Mills, called “Lily Weaving Suggestions”.  These pamphlets started out, at least, in a more magazine–like format. They were in color and longer, most were 6 pages,  with stapled binding.

Lily Weaving Suggestions 2

The projects were more modern, some with a counter-culture vibe, some with a more fashion-forward bent. To wit: the issue with a cover model rocking a pair of handwoven denim “jeans” 😉 .

Lily Weaving Suggestions 1

The designers changed with each issue, and many names are unfamiliar, although some are: Persis Grayson, Elmer Hickman, Mary E. Black, Sadye Tune Wilson, Sallie T. Guy, and Clotilde Barrett.

The Lily Weaving Suggestions series ran from 1976 through 1981, with an issue coming out quarterly. The long format eventually dwindled to the folded pamphlet style, and then stopped altogether (at least, that is as far as my collection goes).

I made a second spreadsheet listing all the issues and their contents for this Lily Weaving Suggestions series, and you can see it and/or download it here on ScribD. In addition, The spreadsheet list for “Practical Weaving Suggestions” is also on ScribD here.

In other news, we are closing out week 1 without a kitchen, and we are on the camping-out-in-your-own-house-and-no-way-to-cook diet.

 

 

 

I Love This Stuff

PWS1

I’ve been a collector of the “Practical Weaving Suggestions” pamphlets published by Lily Mills for a long time. These pamphlets go way back to the mid-20th century when weaving was often a cottage industry for homemakers. They provided all kinds projects and ideas, while at the same time marketing Lily’s weaving yarns. Sound familiar? 😉

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Many very well-known authors of handweaving books wrote for Lily Mills, such as Mary Atwater, Harriet Tidball, Osma Gallinger, and Berta Frey. One pamphlet titled “The Profile System of Writing Drafts: How to Adapt the Same Design to Several Techniques” by Helen L. Allen and Osma Gallinger, a seemingly revolutionary concept at the time, was a very detailed transcript of a presentation made at a national conference.

The publishing dates for the early issues are unknown to me. They are labeled by Volume and Number, starting with Vol. I, No. 1, and continuing through Vol. XXVIII. Then a different number system begins with Vol. I-55. My guess? Volume I, 1955.  The last issue in this system that I have is Vol. I-71 (i. e., 1971).  I started a spreadsheet for this collection as a way of keeping track of what’s missing and what I have duplicates of.

I don’t remember the first time I found one of these pamphlets, maybe at a library book sale, but when eBay took off, I bought a lot of them. Then recently I bought another big batch (thank you, Facebook buying and selling groups!!!).  They may be old-fashioned, but they are packed with weaving history and information, and even some very precious woven samples. Many are in very fragile condition depending on how they were treated for the last, oh, 50 or so years. Some have 3-hole punches for a binder. Some have name stickers. Some are just ragged around the edges, but aren’t we all?

Anyway, recently Interweave Press put out a call for submissions on the topic of multiple projects on a long warp. Well, I have to say that Lily Mills had that one covered more than a half century ago. And when I say long warp, we’re talking 40 yards (!). However, the projects are probably not to the taste of today’s weaver. Aprons, anyone?

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PWS4

In other news, I have a dishtowel warp on the loom, and looming (hahaha) plans for a full kitchen renovation. Luckily, I can weave upstairs, the cats will be boarded at the kitty hotel, and I can weave while pandemonium reigns.