On Dots

Here is my latest turned draft: Turned Summer and Winter Dots. Dots as opposed to circles, which are really nothing more than big dots. It’s all a matter of scale. 😉

The origin of this draft began in the January/February 2015 issue of Handwoven Magazine with the Summer and Winter with a Twist Polka-Dot Towels by Linda Adamson. This is an 8-shaft draft with a tie-up that requires a whole lot of treadles, with the best case scenario being that you just keep re-tieing (if you don’t have 18 treadles on your loom!). I’ve always wanted to try this draft, but the tie-up was a road-block. Naturally, I thought turning the draft might be a solution.

The first time I turned the draft I got a 10-shaft result and I thought “cool!” and immediately put a warp on my Ashford table loom. This black rayon chenille with the multi-color dots was my first try. It worked great. But. I was about 75% finished when I realized that shaft number 3 had not been threaded at all. This wasn’t my error though. Fiberworks just left it out when it turned the draft. So…. I ran the optimize draft function (might have been in Pixeloom, I can’t really remember) and that reduced the draft to 9 shafts.

This 8/2 rayon scarf is the 9-shaft version. It worked just fine as you can see. Notice that the dots are treadled with more repeats in the center. Scaling down widthwise due to yarn thickness caused me to scale up lengthwise. Dots are fussy like that.

I’m not sharing the draft yet, because I’m hoping to edit the draft to 8 shafts. I very much like the 8/2 rayon. I sett it at 24 epi, and each dot is 16 ends wide including spaces between them.

Lest you think that all I do is weave circles: I have some woven yardage in my future, which I will use for sewing some pants. I will be using up odds and ends of 10/2 cotton in colors that play well together. I’ve also been weaving a selection of rayon chenille scarves for my Etsy shop.

Last but not least, I want to thank all my readers who purchased a copy of the Turned Taqueté Circles Placemats Weaving Pattern PDF + WIF from my Etsy shop. Your response was really exciting. Next I want to see examples of your work!

Digitally Speaking

Yesterday I launched a new direction for my weaving. I posted downloadable PDF directions and the WIF file for Turned Taqueté Circles Placemats in my Etsy shop. The pattern is written for 5/2 perle cotton with suggestions for two different color palettes, the Blues pictured above, and for Mid-Century Modern colors.

For literally years I have provided my Circles Turned Taquete Towels draft for free to folks who visit my blog, and I have been happy to do so. The time seemed to be right to take it on the road, so to speak, and get a little return on my investment. I published my towels pattern in the March/April 2019 issue of Handwoven Magazine. You might think that I made money on it from that publication. But you would be wrong. Handwoven was on the verge of bankruptcy at that point, and it went down without making good on many payments to their content providers, including me.

So. This is my way of getting a little bit back, and if you have enjoyed using my towels pattern, perhaps, you might be interested in purchasing my placemats pattern. My Etsy shop is linked on the right hand side of this blog entry.

Cheers!

At Last

When we last touched base I was busily working on a draft for Turned Summer and Winter Dukagang Style in a circles design. The fabulous Tippy was going through her quarantine after radioactive iodine treatment. She no sooner got sprung when she went back into cat confinement because of an infected abscess (don’t ask where) and she had to wear the cone of shame and she didn’t handle it at all well. But she is healed and healthy now and all is well.

Finally, I got back to weaving, and this is what I have to show now. The first draft is the final one derived from my profile draft (see previous post), and the second is the cut back version. The first one wove ovals, as one would expect.

The second one, which looks like turned ovals, actually wove circles. Yayyy!

I chose 12/2 Tencel for ground and pattern warps and for weft, and hand painted all of it. The ground warp was all dark purple, and the pattern warp alternated between purple/space dyed Ferns and purple/space dyed Caribbean. (Ferns and Caribbean are colorways that often appear in my Etsy shop, BTW.) I sett the warp at 32 epi and wove with purple on one shuttle throughout. This worked very well on my table loom, because, on a table loom there’s enough to worry about with the levers and the iPad, etc. At 32 epi, each circle was 1.875″ wide. With finer yarns sett at 36 or 48 the circles will naturally shrink to dots. 🙂

So, the big reveal:

The front and back are visible here, and we can see the vertical emphasis of weaving Dukagang style. The scarf is very light in feel, and notice that you can see through the cloth, giving a lacy quality to the whole fabric.

Next up, you might think I am done with dots, but you would be wrong. Stay tuned!

“Turned” Summer and Winter Circles

These are Summer and Winter scarves that came off the Ashford loom recently. I used 12/2 tencel for warp and tabby weft, and 6/2 tencel for pattern weft. I like them a lot, and I really enjoyed weaving them, but I had issues. For one, weaving with two shuttles. Not a fan. For two, the drape is good, but I thought it could improve. Turned Summer and Winter could theoretically solve both those problems. Two shuttles to one shuttle. Horizontal floats becoming vertical floats.

This is the profile draft I used for this project:

Ten blocks when using Summer and Winter for block substitution becomes a 12 harness weave in classic Summer and Winter style. (Keep in mind that the ovals result in a graphic representation that includes tabbies and doesn’t account for thick and thin yarns in the weft. When weaving, I shortened up everything to achieve actual circles 🙂 .)

The weaving program will turn the draft for you, resulting in the following. I know this is very tiny so I’ll just tell you that when turned, the draft morphs to 22 harnesses. Too many for me! (Again adjustments to the treadling might have to be made, this time to lengthen the ovals.)

Not to be deterred, I did some research in my journals and magazines and found two articles that were really helpful. Nothing in my books though. Apparently turning Summer and Winter isn’t really a popular topic, though it really should be. Because…..

What if you could turn a design without actually rotating it? What if you could do it without needing more harnesses? What if you could improve drapability, not needing two weights of warp yarn (with the possible necessity of a second warp beam)? I found the answers to these questions in two articles, one in Weaver’s Issue 29 Fall 1995 by Ingrid Boesel, and one in Complex Weavers Journal number 72, May 2003 by Bonnie Inouye.

In her article “How to Start at the End of a Project and Work Backwards” Ingrid Boesel describes the evolution of a turned classic style Summer and Winter fabric woven on 16 harnesses. The crucial nugget that hooked me was that she used the same weight of yarn for ground and pattern in the warp. By alternating dark and light in the warp and using a twill (closer) sett she created the contrast needed for the pattern design. Boesel used a skeleton tie-up to keep the number of treadles in check. And, she used a different type of tabby.

Bonnie Inouye’s article in Complex Weavers Journal, titled “Turning Leaves”, describes how she developed a fabric for turned Dukagang style Summer and Winter. Her challenge was that she had a design for maple leaves that she wanted to weave in turned Summer and Winter, but if she turned the design the leaves would be oriented incorrectly. It took my quarantine-addled brain a goodly while to work through her process and finally come to understand it, and when I did I knew that drawing from Boesel and Inouye was exactly what I needed to make my “turned” Summer and Winter Circles without actually turning them. (Because, think about it, you don’t really need to turn a circle do you????)

So. I opted for Summer and Winter treadled Dukagang style in the block substitution program. Dukagang style uses one harness for the pattern in the tie-up, as opposed to Classic Summer and Winter which uses two.

I used my weaving program to turn the draft and this resulted (with some modifications):

The modifications being: Now the warp colors alternate light and dark. The weft color is also light. The number of harnesses is still the same. The pattern harness is still only number one. But, this is big: the tabbies are now what Inouye calls “pseudotabbies.” With these changes, the weft floats become warp floats. Drapability is improved. Only one shuttle will be needed.

Observe and compare:

Ingrid Boesel’s fabric also made use of “pseudotabbies” although she treadled it in classic Summer and Winter style, and interestingly, lengthened the floats for even more drape. I have produced the same results in classic S&W with a skeleton tie-up and pseudotabbies. So I can experiment with Dukagang or Classic. (Fist pump!) I will use 12/2 Tencel in both warp and weft, setting it at 30 ends per inch.

Right now my loom room is all in a jumble because we have to accommodate one of our cats in a kitty infirmary as she lives through the aftereffects of a radioactive iodine shot due to hyperthyroidism. Once she’s out of quarantine I will be experimenting with this new “Turned” Summer and Winter on my Ashford loom.

Say hi to Tippy.

Placemats Again

Back toward the end of last year I was planning a Turned Taqueté circles placemats warp in Mid-Century Modern colors. Meanwhile I got a special order for the circles placemats in blues before I could get my act together, so that went on the loom first. Once finished, I did something I’ve never done, but have been tempted to do for a little while.

I tied on a new warp to the old warp. And aside from a couple of tying mistakes (don’t ask) it worked very well. And because I tied on to the old warp, I was able to eke out one more placemat than I thought I was going to get from the warp. Pretty cool!

Here they are still on the loom:

Here are the finished placemats, now residing in my Etsy shop:

The warp is 5/2 cotton, sett at 24 ends per inch, and the same width on the loom as my ubiquitous dishtowels. It was fun working in an entirely new colorway. I seemed to be in a rut in that regard, so a completely different style concept was very welcome.

The warp that I tied onto is still in place, waiting for my next project, which will be dishtowels. And how great is it that the towels will be the same sett and width as the placemats?

My 15 Seconds of Fame

Sometime last Fall I was contacted by one of the editors at HGTV Magazine about using some of my towels for sale on Etsy in an upcoming issue for their Food + Stuff page. Naturally, I was intrigued. Not promising that I would be chosen, they nevertheless asked me to send some towels to be considered for a photo shoot. And so I did. Having my work on Etsy noticed by magazine editors was totally unexpected, but kind of a fun adrenalin rush.

I sent three towels off to the photo shoot site. It didn’t take long for them to get back to me that one had been chosen for the magazine, and they were all mailed back to me pretty promptly. I was impressed. But. They wouldn’t tell me which one was chosen, keeping it a surprise. I did know that it would appear in the January/February 2021 issue.

Then I got busy weaving a few more in the same basic design and colorway, thinking that when the magazine came out, some people might read the teeny tiny print at the bottom of the page and actually look on Etsy to see if they could buy one or two. You never know 😉

Since I no longer go the grocery store, I have no idea if the magazine is actually on the stands, but I did purchase a e-magazine on Zinio, so I know it’s out there somewhere.

Summer and Winter Circles Scarf Saga

So my plan, about two months ago, was to weave circles in Summer and Winter. I was looking to broaden my circles repertoire. (Turned Taqueté fatigue anyone?) I am a big fan of unit weaves, and I wove a lot of Summer and Winter in the late 80’s and into the 90’s. Therefore I did a deep dive into my profile drafts of circles to see what looked good. From there it would be a quick process to get from profile draft to a full fledged Summer and Winter threading draft.

I found this:

This is a 10 block profile draft. It was previously unusable for me when I only had 8 harnesses to work with. But, now, with 16 harnesses at my disposal, I can use up to 14 blocks. I started doing block substitution in Fiberworks and came up with this:

This is a draft for 12-harness Summer and Winter. Looks good, right? Look carefully, and you will see that there are tabby treadles provided, but no tabby inserted into the treadling. I find it odd that the block substitution function in Fiberworks doesn’t automatically insert the tabby, because, the structure is useless without it. But there you are.

So, if you tell the program to insert the tabby please, this is what you get:

Suddenly, the lovely circles were transformed into ovals. I struggled with this result for a while. You can try to adjust for thread thickness in both threading and treadling, which I did, but this is time consuming, and really not very productive. You really have to weave the design to get a sense of how the proportions will play out.

I planned on using 12/2 tencel at 5040 yards per pound for warp that I had dyed a nice Pewter Gray. It’s been so long since I wove S&W that I had to check what the correct sett would be. My sources recommended a tabby sett for Summer and Winter. Tabby for 12/2 tencel is 24 epi. Which I went with. I recently bought some 2/10 Merino/Tencel Colrain lace weight, which at 2800 yards per pound is roughly the right weight for a pattern weft.

Once I got weaving, I soon realized (like, immediately) that the circles I had planned were definitely working out to be ovals. Yet, if you’ve ever woven on a table loom, you know that unweaving is to be avoided at all costs.

So, notice the bottom of this photo. Ovals. I quickly decided to incorporate the ovals into the overall design, and weave a less elongated oval next.

And then an even less elongated oval next, which now looks like ovals just turned sideways:

Now I was finally getting the circles I envisioned. See the middle part of the scarf photos.

Anyway, I really enjoyed the process, and I think I will be tying to on the this warp and weaving at least one more scarf like it. But after that? Turned Summer and Winter!

Book Chat: Seats of London A Field Guide to London Transport Moquette Patterns by Andrew Martin

And now that we can breathe again. . .

Here’s something different, a really interesting little gem of a book for textile geeks like me. I found this book in an Instagram post by Wallace Sewell. Wallace Sewell (or Emma Sewell and Harriet Wallace-Jones) is a British textile design firm specializing in Bauhaus-inspired weaving for the home and for people. I have been inspired by their work for some time. Turns out they are part of a long line of textile designers who have contributed their eye-popping designs to London Transport.

But I digress.

Moquette is French for carpet, woven of wool with cotton backing and tufted, with either loops or cut pile or a combination. Moquette is used on London’s transport (tubes, buses, trams) seats. LT requires that moquette be patterned, partly for decorative effect, but also because the patterns hide dirt. Four colors are used, but the effects of cut and uncut pile make it feel like more. The pile is warm and comfortable in winter, cool in summer, and makes for an inviting tube or bus ride where one would otherwise feel bored, crowded, and miserable.

The tradition of using moquette for LT seating is a century old, and many big names in industrial design have contributed to the history of these textiles including Paul Nash, Enid Marx, Marion Dorn, and Marianne Straub, as well as today’s Wallace Sewell. Styles evolved from Art Deco to Streamlined Machine Age, to Wartime Austerity to Sixties Op.

The moquettes themselves have names, some whimsical: Colindale, Bushey, Ladder, Double Diamond, Trilobite or Fossil, Blue Blaze, and Barman, to name a few.

Alperton by
Paul Nash
Grid by
Enid Marx
“Straub” by Marianne Straub

The book itself is a history of London’s tube lines and buses, as well as the fabrics that were used in them. Each two-page spread is a mini chapter about the evolution of public transport along with the fabrics used. The majority of photos are in color. If, like me, you are feeling very inspired, The London Transport Museum shop offers moquette designs in a furniture line, as well as socks and face masks. Check it out: https://www.ltmuseumshop.co.uk/

This is a true romp through 20th century textile history. Enjoy!

(Please excuse the bad scans 😉 )

On Circles

I’ve been weaving a lot of circles lately. Thinking it might be time for a another blog post. And trying to decide on a snappy title, something to do with circles. I found some circly phrases on Google: circle game, full circle, circling the drain, circle the wagons, magic circle. Nothing spoke to me. So I went with a title that hinted of treatises. Very dignified, no?

I have just finished another dishtowel warp. The Turned Taqueté draft is such a classic by now. I see lots of examples of towels on Instagram and Facebook, and the multitude of color combinations and treadling variations are wonderful. In my last blog post I hinted at a new variation that I was working on, but, sadly, I was disappointed once I committed to trying to weave it.

But this last warp does have a new and improved aspect that I would like to share, albeit very subtle.

This is the draft as it was published by Handwoven magazine last year. Each circle depends for its roundness on the repeats of treadles 2414 or 1828. This draft presupposes a warp of 8/2 cotton sett at 24 epi. But. Sometimes I found myself beating a bit harder and finding my circles somewhat …. compressed.

I found that by adding a half unit in each of the circled (treadling) areas, that is, starting each area with a 1 and ending with a 1x, that the roundness and predictability of roundness vastly improved.

And, it turns out this is a much easier sequence to remember.

This is the other circles warp that I’m weaving right now on my Ashford. It is a 16 harness point twill draft and comes from the collection called Thrilling Twills by the late Ingrid Boesel from Fiberworks. The possibilities are endless on this kind of draft. Change the liftplan (or tie-up) and you have a piece that is entirely different.

As soon as I started my adventures on the table loom, I realized that I liftplans were essential to making any kind of progress when weaving.

[A liftplan is a treadling scheme which is particularly useful for floor looms having a direct tie-up, one shaft per treadle; for dobby looms, mechanical or computer; and for table looms. The tie-up part of the layout is either empty or appears as a straight diagonal line.]

I am a very visual person, and as it turns out, I find that liftplans are infinitely better for visualizing a weave design. Consider the Turned Taqueté draft in liftplan mode:

While I would never attempt to weave from this on my treadle loom, someone with an 8 harness table loom would find this a very snappy alternative, no?

My journey into weaving theory has included a deep dive into the book The Liftplan Connection by Alice Schlein. This is a manual which teaches how to use Photoshop and pattern presets to design for dobby looms. Liftplans! My version of Photoshop is a very up to date Photoshop 2020. But with persistence I’ve been able to take her tutorials using a much older version and make them work. Mostly.